Sunday, 1 September 2013

Saints and sinners...

So the last two weeks i prepped my classroom...here is the link to our new Class Two blog...

http://holywoodsteinerclasstwo2013.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/getting-it-all-ready.html

Here are some photos from the blog...

St Brenden the Navigator...who spent seven years looking
for Paradise and found it on Easter morning!



Well, i can tell you now that i have never worked so hard as when i work as a Steiner teacher. The sheer amount of material you need to go through and to process and then try and convey to the children. The number of things needed to be memorised and then told to a roomful of children which is enough to scare anyone surely, and for songs to be learnt and art of be done, etc, etc...

So why the heck do i do it? Because it is meaningful and FUN and also because i believe in it. I get to work with some of the most ridiculously talented people i have ever met and i get to introduce children to this world we live in. It sounds daft, but it is a privelege, honestly it is. And how often can anyone say that about their work? So i know i am lucky.

I was fascinated reading about the Irish saints. Especially St Columba whom i wish i had met. He clearly was a real person. Born into royalty and destined to be a king himself, he was then educated to priesthood and he seemed to be a pretty kickass monk. Except that being Irish he loved fighting and was eventually exiled to Iona for having gone to war over a copy of the Book of Psalms.

Game of Thrones has nothing on Columba. The other thing i loved discovering about was Dalriada. I love the sound of Dalriada. It sounds like Avalon or Shangrila, except it was not. It was Western Scotland and East Northern Ireland... it was like South East Asia, except that it was cold. People used to jump in and out of boats all the time. They rowed to islands and across oceans. They traded and fought and fell in love and went to war and then made treaties and exchanged children, it was amazing. Bangor was an important centre of Christianity. In fact all of Belfast Lough was pretty crucial. Lough Foyle, Carlingford Lough...these places which are now sleepy peaceful backwaters were the centres of learning and erudition. Bangor's traditions came from the Middle East! Imagine that! When the monks arrived in Bangor they said they heard choirs of angels singing. Did you ever hear the like. It has really given me such a different perspective of the place.

Of course you don't tell the children this. But you keep it in mind and this i do believe is enough to convey some sense of the importance of the geography. That we in Holy-wood follow a long and hallowed tradition.

Being so busy has been great for me. And i'm bound to get busier still. In fact i don't think it stops till Christmas when i get to take some kind of breath.

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